unphh:

kuntsnuggles:

I have this problem where ‘the other day’ for me ranges from yesterday to around 5 years ago

and ‘a friend of mine’ is literally anybody i’ve ever heard of who’s opinion i like

wonnderr-lusttt:

looow-tus:

undftdaniel:

defend-sissy-boy-emo:

jadelyn:

holypuckingcow:

abbysetcetera:

Adulthood doesn’t mean you stop drinking juice pouches and eating fruit snacks. It means buying your own. 

and mixing them with vodka

At 3 in the morning while marathoning your favorite show because nobody can tell you to go to bed.

And then regretting your decisions the next morning.

Because you have to work.

and make more money to buy fruit snacks and juice pouches.

and vodka

askbaguettequartetandelise:

Axeman: Green… you do know they’re not real.

Greencoat: They’re real! You’re just jealous…

castleabc:

#Castle Season 7 premieres in 10 days! Where do you think Rick Castle has disappeared to?

castleabc:

#Castle Season 7 premieres in 10 days! Where do you think Rick Castle has disappeared to?

chewytriforce:

effyeahultimatespiderman:

Peter and Loki trying to use each other’s powers - Ultimate Spider-Man 3x01

wintersoldierfell:

ohhaiguise:

  (x)

Okay, but this movie wins the award for Best Use of Manpain, tho.

In any other movie, Raleigh would’ve spent 90 minutes being like MY PAIN IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN YOUR STUPID WAR, and instead, he snaps back into action as soon as he meets Mako. That’s awesome. But what floors me is that he uses his own grief to help Mako survive hers. He knows how awful it is to lose your family. He knows what she’s going through. And instead of whining or thinking his pain makes him entitled to opt out of his responsibilities, he empathizes with Mako, supports her, and encourages her.

Raleigh’s greatest strength is his compassion. And that’s the kind of male hero I’d like to see on my screen, please.

Plus, like, a bazillion more movies about Mako Mori.

not-100percent-a-dick:

bythepowercosmic:

Finally! Deadpool To Hit Theaters In 2016

Just a few hours after star Ryan Reynolds opened up about the reaction to the Deadpool leaked footage, 20th Century Fox has announced they are moving forward with the film and given it a February 12, 2016 release date, just three months before the upcoming X-Men: Apocalypse. Ryan Reynolds is expected to star with director Tim Miller at the helm and a script by Zombieland writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick.


HOLY SHIT

not-100percent-a-dick:

bythepowercosmic:

Finally! Deadpool To Hit Theaters In 2016

Just a few hours after star Ryan Reynolds opened up about the reaction to the Deadpool leaked footage, 20th Century Fox has announced they are moving forward with the film and given it a February 12, 2016 release date, just three months before the upcoming X-Men: Apocalypse. Ryan Reynolds is expected to star with director Tim Miller at the helm and a script by Zombieland writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick.

HOLY SHIT

newandclassicemo:

A high school banned the marching band from playing Fall Out Boy songs because the lyrics were suggestive.

A marching band

Isn’t allowed to play Fall Out Boy 

Because of suggestive lyrics

Marching bands are instrumental

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

yanavaseva:

mechanicusdeus:

purebaldfury:

faidame:

wat rings u got bitch?

Thus the myth of the knight lumbering around like Frankenstein is busted

This myth bugs me to no end, so let me clear it up here and now:
A made-to-measure suit of full plate armour is (and ergo was) less cumbersome to wear than, say, an ill-fitting all-weather coat. It was expensive as heck, but the movement it afforded was surprisingly non-restrictive. Also remember that the men who wore these suits were usually quite physically fit (medieval knights - who were among the few who could afford the armour - were trained to fight from around 6 years-old), and were accustomed to training while wearing them.
Plate armour was moderately heavy, granted, but the weight was optimally distributed over the body, meaning the mostly costly aspect of wearing it was increased fatigue. It’s not heavy in the same way a hiking backpack is heavy. Any accounts of a knight being unable to rise after being knocked down were most likely because he was injured, dehydrated, or just plain exhausted - all of which being common in battle anyway. Regardless, it’s unlikely that it’s because his armour prevented him from moving… and the fallacy of knights requiring cranes to get onto their horses is just stupid.
The idea that full plate was sooo impractical is ludicrous; if it were, people wouldn’t have bothered with it.

"But plate armor is increadibly heavyyyy! Only giant musclemen can even move in iiiit! It’s completely useless against agile unarmored foooooes! Women can’t even put it oooon, its sole weight will nail them in one placeeee!"

If it’s not “the distraction factor" that people use to try to justify ridiculous female armor, it’s "agility".
We’ve featured another video that dispelled many myths about field plate armor, but the performers weren’t as agile as the noble knight above.
Partially this myth survives I think because like Dungeons and Dragons always insist on selling up the idea that heavier armors come with heavier agility penalties.  And to a certain extent, there are certain activities I wouldn’t expect to be able to do while wearing plate armor.
Rock climbing without tools or ropes
High diving and synchronized swimming
Aerial gymnastics 
Dancing en pointe
Okay I don’t do any of those things but you get the point.
Practical armor is made to allow at least a fair amount of agility for it’s wearer for a simple reason: The best defense is not to be in the way of the attack, that way you don’t suffer any of the impact.
Or to put it a simpler way:  Lots of safety gear is uncomfortable and encumbering, but was the last time you heard someone propose that workers should just go without - that way if there’s an accident they’ll be able to get out of the way quicker?
- wincenworks

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

yanavaseva:

mechanicusdeus:

purebaldfury:

faidame:

wat rings u got bitch?

Thus the myth of the knight lumbering around like Frankenstein is busted

This myth bugs me to no end, so let me clear it up here and now:

A made-to-measure suit of full plate armour is (and ergo was) less cumbersome to wear than, say, an ill-fitting all-weather coat. It was expensive as heck, but the movement it afforded was surprisingly non-restrictive. Also remember that the men who wore these suits were usually quite physically fit (medieval knights - who were among the few who could afford the armour - were trained to fight from around 6 years-old), and were accustomed to training while wearing them.

Plate armour was moderately heavy, granted, but the weight was optimally distributed over the body, meaning the mostly costly aspect of wearing it was increased fatigue. It’s not heavy in the same way a hiking backpack is heavy. Any accounts of a knight being unable to rise after being knocked down were most likely because he was injured, dehydrated, or just plain exhausted - all of which being common in battle anyway. Regardless, it’s unlikely that it’s because his armour prevented him from moving… and the fallacy of knights requiring cranes to get onto their horses is just stupid.

The idea that full plate was sooo impractical is ludicrous; if it were, people wouldn’t have bothered with it.

"But plate armor is increadibly heavyyyy! Only giant musclemen can even move in iiiit! It’s completely useless against agile unarmored foooooes! Women can’t even put it oooon, its sole weight will nail them in one placeeee!"

If it’s not “the distraction factor" that people use to try to justify ridiculous female armor, it’s "agility".

We’ve featured another video that dispelled many myths about field plate armor, but the performers weren’t as agile as the noble knight above.

Partially this myth survives I think because like Dungeons and Dragons always insist on selling up the idea that heavier armors come with heavier agility penalties.  And to a certain extent, there are certain activities I wouldn’t expect to be able to do while wearing plate armor.

  • Rock climbing without tools or ropes
  • High diving and synchronized swimming
  • Aerial gymnastics 
  • Dancing en pointe

Okay I don’t do any of those things but you get the point.

Practical armor is made to allow at least a fair amount of agility for it’s wearer for a simple reason: The best defense is not to be in the way of the attack, that way you don’t suffer any of the impact.

Or to put it a simpler way:  Lots of safety gear is uncomfortable and encumbering, but was the last time you heard someone propose that workers should just go without - that way if there’s an accident they’ll be able to get out of the way quicker?

- wincenworks